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Thread: Path of a Red Blood Cell

  1. #1
    Registered User Sharon Grant's Avatar
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    Path of a Red Blood Cell



    The circulatory system consisting of the heart, arteries, capillaries, and veins, is the pumping mechanism that transports blood throughout the body.

    In the heart, the left ventricle contracts, pushing red blood cells into the aorta, the body's largest artery. From here, blood moves through a series of increasingly smaller arteries, until it reaches a capillary, the junction between arteries and veins. Here oxygen molecules detach from the red blood cells and slip across the capillary wall into body tissue. Now de-oxygenated, blood begins its return to the heart. It passes through increasingly larger veins to eventually reach the right atrium. It enters the right ventricle, which pumps it through the pulmonary arteries into the lungs, to pick up more oxygen. Oxygenated, blood reenters the left atrium, moves into the left ventricle, and the blood's journey begins again.
    Sharon Grant
    Editorial Team

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  3. #2
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    Oxygen molecules detach from RBC's

    How does this work?

  4. #3
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    I think it is complex

    if you want to find out more about the heart and anaesthesia visit
    YouTube - o2demand's Channel

    and his website

    You may need to be a scientist to understand the detachment, unless you've got a pressing need it may be too difficult to understand [I looked at it before but didn't take it in, can get back to you if you want]

  5. #4
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    Detachment of O2 from RBCs

    I looked at sciencedirect and did a search on google

    I found the link below,

    about design of HBOCs

    ScienceDirect - Biophysical Chemistry : The role of facilitated diffusion in oxygen transport by cell-free hemoglobins: implications for the design of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers

    you may find it interesting, try searching a physiology textbook for the answer, when I finish my project at university I'll try get back to you, but for the present I need to do that.

    Thanks

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