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Thread: Anti-C antibody or "little c" - pregnancy

  1. #1
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    Unhappy Anti-C antibody or "little c" - pregnancy

    Hi everyone,

    This is my first post here, so please bear with me. We are J.W.'s, and my mom is approx. 16 weeks pregnant. She was called Thursday and told that there was a problem with her bloodwork. Something about "little c" or Anti-C antibody. She was told that this may cause the baby to become anemic, and the doctors would want to give it a blood transfusion either right after birth, or even thru the cord, before it's born. She's since looked it up on the internet and has found two things: 1. it's very rare, and 2., the prognosis for the baby isn't good. Can anyone enlighten us a little? Is there any other treatment? She's going to try to call the OB tomorrow, but they actually had to look it up in the book to find out what it was, so we're not expecting to here a lot from him. I appreciate any help you can give us!

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  3. #2
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    Anti C or c

    Anti-C and anti-c are both antibodies in the Rh system in the blood. If your mom has never been transfused, then she was exposed to the C or c antigen in a previous pregnancy, and her body made the antibody as a protective mechanism. Both have the potential to cause HDN (hemolytic disease of the newborn) if the baby has the corresponding antigen (either C or c) on his/her red cells. It is true that in severe HDN, the usual treatment can be exchange transfusions in the newborn, but only your mom's OB will be able to evaluate the severity by performing more blood tests as the pregnancy progresses. She should follow up with her OB.

  4. #3
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    Thanks for your reply! I'm happy to announce that the OB called today and informed us that the lab technician read the computer print-out wrong, and that everything is fine with Mom and baby!

  5. #4
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    Hello and I know this is a stressful time for you. Esspecially since the doctors don't seem to be telling you much. My first recomedation is that you go to a doctor who has dealt with this sort of issue a lot. It is important for you and the health of your baby. The ob will need to monitor you and the baby several times a week throughout your pregnancy and you want a doctor who knows what they are doing and what to look for. With that being said I had the same issue my last preganacy. I know the doctors can freak you out. But just because thier is a blood incompatibility doesn't mean there will be issue it just means there can be issues. Little c antibodies is what I have. Something happened where in my third pregnancy mine and my daughters bloods mixed. Now since my husband can only give our children c blood I had to be monitored. As the lady said before it is similar to the RH factor. It is just a diffrent protien that can be found on the blood that is the issue. When you have anitbodies your body sees the fetus and fights it like you were allergic to it almost. By fighting it I mean breaking down the babies red blood cells. What they did with me was I had to go in once a week for a while and then once i hit week 24 it was three times a week. They do an unltrasound on you every time to measure the babies organs and do a fetal movement count. Then towards the end they will give you non stress tests to make sure things are okay there too. What they are making sure of is that the baby isn't showing signs of hydrops. I ended up having a amnio at week 35 to see if the babies lungs were developed and they were so they induced me and went ahead and delivered my son. This was because once you hit week 35 the ultra sound isn't as accurate and they didn't feel the need to leave the baby in a "hostile" inviroment any longer than need be. When he was born he was very jaundice which is a cause of the blood incompatibility. When your body breaks down their red blood cells it causes a high billy rueben level because their liver can't break down the waste fast enough. It was a ruff first few weeks after he was born but he is healthy and happy now and a year old. Remember just because they say bad things can happen doesn't mean they will. The doctors should monitor you closely to make sure at the first signs of complications they catch it and can act. I will say though that my doctor told me that with each child after the risks of complication and injury to the child is greater, also the older you get before becoming pregnant again plays a factor. I hope this has helped.

  6. #5
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    Thank you!!!

    This is the first time in the 20 years I've been having children that I've heard such great explanation of my problem with my blood. I am currently 34.5 wks pregnant with baby #9 and am being watched for pre-eclampsia even though my bp is usually low 110/70 but had dropped to 108/70 two weeks ago even though I was put on 3 300mg iron pills per day plus folic acid. Today, my bp was 129/86 a big jump for me. I have had this issue since the birth of my 3rd child, first one was a girl then two boys and have been monitored ever since. At my son's birth, I broke out in blisters from head to toe and they called it pemphigus gestationus or something like that. They said no more children with my husband. I am A+ and he is O-. Someone said it was the rh factor in reverse. I've never had an adequate explanation for it. However, I've gone on to deliver 2 more girls, then twin girls and a son and now will be delivering via c-section this last baby at 39 wks on May 6th unless something happens to make it sooner.
    They just drew more blood to watch the anti c antibody last week and we are awaiting the results of that test. I read on here an ultrasound could help determine if baby is ready to be born? I've had a bad cough ever since getting bronchitis in January and it won't go away and I'm wondering if this has anything to do with whatever else is going on? I've only gained 16 lbs so far, not bad for me, have had protein in my urine for a few months now, and then today they decided to have me come every week to monitor for pre eclampsia. Is this all connected? From what I've seen on here, it'd be better to have the baby earlier as opposed to waiting? Again thanks for the answers I've sought for the past 15 years! My babies are usually overdue, I don't go into productive labor without induction, and only had the one son who was born during the blister disease without an induction.

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